You should be embarrassed if you’re an adult mooching off your parents

If you consider yourself an adult, it doesn’t matter what you think you’ve accomplished – if you get a penny from your parents, you’re still a child. Period.

My wife’s best friend hasn’t worked a day in her life. Let’s call her Lisa. Lisa gets to enjoy all the fruits of labor that a normal, working adult earned, without having earned it. The worst part – she thinks she earned it.

She mooches off her parents but she doesn’t think she’s mooching. She says stupid things like “Oh what else are they going to spend their money on” and truly believes she’s getting what she deserves. She even has the balls to call other people moochers.

Lisa looks at my wife, who works a full time job, commutes to work, manages deadlines – and sees herself no different – because Lisa has all the same things my wife has. Earning them is irrelevant. She thinks having those same things make ls her equal. As smart as she thinks she is, she’s not very bright – obviously.

This is the worst kind of spoiled – justified spoilage. A mooch who thinks she’s not a moocher.

Lisa has a nice apartment, new car and vacations twice a year. Her parents finance her life. She’s 35 years old – that’s not a typo – she’s in her mid thirties…and oblivious to the fact that her lifestyle is something 99.9% of people work hard to achieve. Since she has all these things given to her for free, she fancies herself an accomplished adult that deserves everything she has. She has no job and no ambitions but she thinks she’s an adult.

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School doesn’t prepare you for the real world

School paints a false reality of the real world. Not only is this “reality” completely wrong, but worse, they convince students the real world is most definitely going to be the way they say it is. Students, having never yet lived in the real world, naturally believe it to be accurate. But, of course the real world is nothing like way schools describe it.

instead of simply peddling a false sense of the “real world,” they take it a step further and convince students that this “real world” they describe is exactly what students should anticipate once they leave academia. They paint it as a magical place where jobs are plentiful and available to anyone who gets a good degree and follows the rules.

So not only do students get a false perception of how the real world works, but they are forced to believe that the schools version of reality is absolutely true. It’s not just moronic and irresponsible, it’s deceptive and malicious because after leaving school, students continue to search for thisnversion of the “real world” painted in their heads by the school system – a reality that doesn’t exist.

The result is not just students when are shocked and surprised by what the real world is actually like, but they go into denial, refusing the accept the real world entirely and waiting for their version of the real world – filled with promises of a bright future – to materialize.

Its not that schools don’t tell students Santa Claus doesn’t exist. They tell students that Santa really definitely exists, and tells them they should search and wait for him to appear because he’s absolutely real. It’s incredibly dangerous and explains, in part, why recent graduates are so dillusional and unrealistic about what to expect as an adult.

Their value to the economy, their perceived skills and knowledge, are said to be absolute and “special” in this fantasy world instilled into them by every teacher, professor and guidance counselor they’ve ever encountered.

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